Does Germany celebrate an Independence Day, like the USA does?

Every year on July 4th people in the United States gather with their families or friends to celebrate the birth of the independent country of America. This is considered to be the most important holiday in the country as it represents the values that all American people share regardless of where they live or what they do for a living: to be free from oppression, to have a voice in decision making for the country, to have equal opportunities to pursue their dreams. For many years, it has been an official holiday in the US, filled with fireworks, parades, family gatherings and barbecues. For some, this day becomes an opportunity to reflect on why they celebrate independent America, and ponder what the future might hold for the country.

Source: Pinterest.com



Does Germany have an Independence Day, too?


The short answer is: no. Countries such as Germany, France, or Great Britain, do not have an independence day because they were never occupied by anyone for any long period of time. The United States of America, as a former colony of the British Empire, is in a different position. Having defended their independence and forming a new country on the globe is a page in history that every American should be proud of. Nevertheless, European countries had multiple important historic events to celebrate throughout their history.


The closest to celebrating independence in Germany will be the October 3rd, when the country celebrates the reunification of Germany in 1990. Interestingly enough, this date was chosen by Germans because the actual date of the fall of the Berlin wall, separating two parts of Germany, fell on November 9th, the day when Nazi attacked Jewish population in 1938, and could not be celebrated, so Germans declared that the national holiday is the October 3rd, the Day of German Unity. It is celebrated with festivities and fireworks in Berlin and other parts of Germany.

Source: GJU.edu.jo

7 views

©2020 Holistic Lessons

Web by Arazo Media

  • Twitter
  • White LinkedIn Icon